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Tracking of overweight and obesity from early childhood to adolescence in a population-based cohort – the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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110 Dimensions

Readers on

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151 Mendeley
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Title
Tracking of overweight and obesity from early childhood to adolescence in a population-based cohort – the Tromsø Study, Fit Futures
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12887-016-0599-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elin Evensen, Tom Wilsgaard, Anne-Sofie Furberg, Guri Skeie

Abstract

Obesity is a serious childhood health problem today. Studies have shown that overweight and obesity tend to be stable (track) from birth, through childhood and adolescence, to adulthood. However, existing studies are heterogeneous; there is still no consensus on the strength of the association between high birth weight or high body mass index (BMI) early in life and overweight and obesity later in life, nor on the appropriate age or target group for intervention and prevention efforts. This study aimed to determine the presence and degree of tracking of overweight and obesity and development in BMI and BMI standard deviation scores (SDS) from childhood to adolescence in the Fit Futures cohort from North Norway. Using a retrospective cohort design, data on 532 adolescents from the Fit Futures cohort were supplemented with height and weight data from childhood health records, and BMI was calculated at 2-4, 5-7, and 15-17 years of age. Participants were categorized into weight classes by BMI according to the International Obesity Taskforce's age- and sex-specific cut-off values for children 2-18 years of age (thinness: adult BMI <18.5 kg/m(2), normal weight: adult BMI ≥18.5- < 25 kg/m(2), overweight: adult BMI ≥25- < 30 kg/m(2), obesity: adult BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)). Non-parametric tests, Cohen's weighted Kappa statistic and logistic regression were used in the analyses. The prevalence of overweight and obesity combined, increased from 11.5 % at 2-4 years of age and 13.7 % at 5-7 years of age, to 20.1 % at 15-17 years of age. Children who were overweight/obese at 5-7 years of age had increased odds of being overweight/obese at 15-17 years of age, compared to thin/normal weight children (crude odds ratio: 11.1, 95 % confidence interval: 6.4-19.2). Six out of 10 children who were overweight/obese at 5-7 years of age were overweight/obese at 15-17 years of age. The prevalence of overweight and obesity increased with age. We found a moderate indication of tracking of overweight/obesity from childhood to adolescence. Preventive and treatment initiatives among children at high risk of overweight and obesity should start before 5-7 years of age, but general preventive efforts targeting all children are most important.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 151 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Unknown 149 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 27 18%
Student > Master 19 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 11%
Researcher 15 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 9%
Other 30 20%
Unknown 30 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 15%
Sports and Recreations 14 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Social Sciences 5 3%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 43 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2018.
All research outputs
#2,828,557
of 22,870,727 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#417
of 3,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,771
of 305,000 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#5
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,870,727 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,008 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 305,000 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.