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Increasing blood pressure and its associated factors in Canadian children and adolescents from the Canadian Health Measures Survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2012
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Title
Increasing blood pressure and its associated factors in Canadian children and adolescents from the Canadian Health Measures Survey
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-388
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yipu Shi, Margaret de Groh, Howard Morrison

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Canada is facing a childhood obesity epidemic. Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a major complication of obesity. Reports on the impact of excess adiposity on BP in children and adolescents have varied significantly across studies. We evaluated the independent effects of obesity, physical activity, family history of hypertension, and socioeconomic status on BP in a nationally representative sample of children and adolescents. METHODS: We analysed cross-sectional data for 1850 children aged 6 to 17 years who participated in the Canadian Health Measures Survey, Cycle 1, 2007-2009. Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were age-, sex-, and height-adjusted to z-scores (SBPZ and DBPZ). Body mass index (BMI) z-scores were calculated based on World Health Organization growth standards. Multivariate linear regression was used to evaluate the independent effects of relevant variables on SBPZ and DBPZ. RESULTS: For most age/sex groups, obesity was positively associated with SBP. Being obese was associated with higher DBP in adolescent boys only. The BP effect of obesity showed earlier in young girls than boys. Obese adolescents were estimated to have an average 7.6 mmHg higher SBP than normal weight adolescents. BMI had the strongest effect on BP among obese children and adolescents. Moderately active adolescent boys had higher SBP (3.9 mmHg) and DBP (4.9 mmHg) than physically active boys. Family history of hypertension showed effects on SBP and DBP in younger girls and adolescent boys. Both family income and parent education demonstrated independent associations with BP in young children. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate the early impact of excess adiposity, insufficient physical activity, family history of hypertension, and socioeconomic inequalities on BP. Early interventions to reduce childhood obesity can, among other things, reduce exposure to prolonged BP elevation and the future risk of cardiovascular disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Unknown 101 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 21 20%
Student > Master 18 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 5%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 25 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 17%
Sports and Recreations 5 5%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 34 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2013.
All research outputs
#9,918,355
of 12,389,284 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,272
of 8,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,936
of 119,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,389,284 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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