↓ Skip to main content

Monosodium urate crystals induce oxidative stress in human synoviocytes

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, May 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Monosodium urate crystals induce oxidative stress in human synoviocytes
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13075-016-1012-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yessica Zamudio-Cuevas, Karina Martínez-Flores, Javier Fernández-Torres, Yahir A. Loissell-Baltazar, Daniel Medina-Luna, Ambar López-Macay, Javier Camacho-Galindo, Cristina Hernández-Díaz, Mónica G. Santamaría-Olmedo, Edgar Oliver López-Villegas, Francesca Oliviero, Anna Scanu, Jorge Francisco Cerna-Cortés, Marwin Gutierrez, Carlos Pineda, Alberto López-Reyes

Abstract

Gout is the most common inflammatory arthropathy of metabolic origin and it is characterized by intense inflammation, the underlying mechanisms of which are unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidative stress in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) exposed to monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, which trigger an inflammatory process. Human FLS isolated from synovial tissue explants were stimulated with MSU crystals (75 μg/mL) for 24 h. Cellular viability was evaluated by crystal violet staining, apoptosis was assessed using Annexin V, and the cellular content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) (O2 (-), H2O2, NO) was assessed with image-based cytometry and fluorometric methods. In order to determine protein oxidation levels, protein carbonyls were detected through oxyblot analysis, and cell ultrastructural changes were assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The viability of FLS exposed to MSU crystals decreased by 30 % (P < 0.05), while apoptosis increased by 42 % (P = 0.01). FLS stimulated with MSU crystals exhibited a 2.1-fold increase in H2O2 content and a 1.5-fold increase in O2 (-) and NO levels. Oxyblots revealed that the spots obtained from FLS protein lysates exposed to MSU crystals exhibited protein carbonyl immunoreactivity, which reflects the presence of oxidatively modified proteins. Concomitantly, MSU crystals triggered the induction of changes in the morphostructure of FLS, such as the thickening and discontinuity of the endoplasmic reticulum, and the formation of vacuoles and misfolded glycoproteins. Our results prove that MSU crystals induce the release of ROS and RNS in FLS, subsequently oxidizing proteins and altering the cellular oxidative state of the endoplasmic reticulum, which results in FLS apoptosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 14 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 15 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2016.
All research outputs
#6,950,415
of 11,622,318 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,146
of 1,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,546
of 276,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#28
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,622,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,602 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,972 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.