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Medical doctors in healthcare leadership: theoretical and practical challenges

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, May 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters

Citations

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47 Dimensions

Readers on

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218 Mendeley
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Title
Medical doctors in healthcare leadership: theoretical and practical challenges
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1392-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jean-Louis Denis, Nicolette van Gestel

Abstract

While healthcare systems vary in their structure and available resources, it is widely recognized that medical doctors play a key role in their adaptation and performance. In this article, we examine recent government and organizational policies in two different health systems that aim to develop clinical leadership among the medical profession. Clinical leadership refers to the engagement and guiding role of physicians in health system improvement. Three dimensions are defined to conduct our analysis of engaging medical doctors in healthcare leadership: the position and status of medical doctors within the system; the broader institutional context of governmental and organizational policies to engage medical doctors in clinical leadership roles; and the main factors that may facilitate or limit achievements. Our aim in this study is exploratory. We selected two contrasting cases according to their level of institutional pluralism: one national health insurance system, Canada, and one etatist social insurance system, the Netherlands. We documented the institutional dynamics of medical doctors' engagement and leadership through secondary sources, such as government websites, key policy reports, and scholarly literature on health policies in both countries. Initiatives across Canadian provinces signal that the medical profession and governments search for alternatives to involve doctors in health system improvement beyond the limitations imposed by their fundamental social contract and formal labour relations. These initiatives suggest an emerging trend toward more joint collaboration between governments and medical associations. In the Dutch system, organizational and legal attempts for integration over the past decades do not yet fit well with the ideas and interests of medical doctors. The engagement of medical doctors requires additional initiatives that are closer to their professional values and interests and that depart from an overly focus on top down performance indicators and competition. Different institutional contexts have different policy experiences regarding the engagement and leadership of medical doctors but seem to face similar policy challenges. Achieving alignment between soft (trust, collaboration) and hard (financial incentives) levers may require facilitative conditions at the level of the health system, like clarity and stability of broad policy orientations and openness to local experimentation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 218 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Unknown 216 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 63 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 9%
Student > Bachelor 19 9%
Other 17 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 8%
Other 35 16%
Unknown 48 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 16%
Business, Management and Accounting 27 12%
Social Sciences 20 9%
Psychology 8 4%
Other 29 13%
Unknown 53 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2021.
All research outputs
#3,692,846
of 22,977,819 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,642
of 7,692 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,744
of 334,643 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#18
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,977,819 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,692 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 334,643 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.