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Comparing the effect of a leaflet and a movie in preventing tick bites and Lyme disease in The Netherlands

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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129 Mendeley
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Title
Comparing the effect of a leaflet and a movie in preventing tick bites and Lyme disease in The Netherlands
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3146-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Desirée Jacqueline Mathieu Angéliqu Beaujean, Rik Crutzen, Fedor Gassner, Caroline Ameling, Albert Wong, James Everard van Steenbergen, Dirk Ruwaard

Abstract

Lyme disease (LD) has become the most common vector borne illness in the Northern hemisphere. Prevention relies predominantly on fostering protective behaviors (e.g., avoiding tick areas, using protective clothing and repellent, and doing routine tick checks post-exposure). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness (in terms of knowledge, perceived severity and susceptibility, self-efficacy, response efficacy, intention, and behavior over time) and appreciation of a leaflet and a movie as tools for informing the public in the Netherlands about ticks and LD protective behaviors. Participants (1,677 at t1 and 361 extra at t2) were members of a representative Internet panel (adults aged 18 years and above). A four group randomized controlled design was used to test the effect of an information leaflet and a movie (two intervention groups), compared to a control group and a follow-up only control group. Data were collected over two periods: July 15-29, 2013 (t1) and at follow-up 4 weeks later, August 16-31, 2013 (t2). Post-intervention results show all respondents in all groups possess good general basic knowledge of ticks and LD. Respondents in both the leaflet and movie groups knew more than respondents in the control group, and had greater awareness of best practices after a tick bite. Intention to perform protective behavior in future was stronger among respondents in the intervention groups. While respondents generally appreciated both the movie and the leaflet, they found the movie ran too long. Follow-up revealed no lasting positive effects from either the leaflet or the movie. Our results suggest that both the movie and the leaflet are valued and effective intervention tools for improving knowledge about tick bites and strengthening self-efficacy and intentions to perform protective behavior against ticks and LD . Achieving lasting effects, however, calls for more action.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 128 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 20%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Researcher 5 4%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 61 47%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 12 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 9%
Psychology 5 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 65 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,341,991
of 12,578,603 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,706
of 8,588 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,866
of 263,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,578,603 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,588 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,429 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them