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Risk factors for onset of hypothermia in trauma victims: The HypoTraum study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Risk factors for onset of hypothermia in trauma victims: The HypoTraum study
Published in
Critical Care, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/cc11449
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frédéric Lapostolle, Jean Sebbah, James Couvreur, François Koch, Dominique Savary, Karim Tazarourte, Gerald Egman, Lynda Mzabi, Michel Galinski, Frédéric Adnet

Abstract

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Hypothermia is common in trauma victims and is associated with an increase in mortality. Its causes are not well understood. Our objective was to identify the factors influencing the onset of hypothermia during pre-hospital care of trauma victims. METHODS: This was a multicenter, prospective, open, observational study in a pre-hospital setting.The subjects were trauma victims, over 18 years old, receiving care from emergency medical services (EMS) and transported to hospital in a medically staffed mobile unit.Study variables included: demographics and morphological traits, nature and circumstances of the accident, victim's presentation (trapped, seated or lying down, on the ground, unclothed, wet or covered by a blanket), environmental conditions (wind, rain, ground temperature and air temperature on site and in the mobile unit), clinical factors, Revised Trauma Score (RTS), tympanic temperature, care provided (including warming, drugs administered, infusion fluid temperature and volume), and EMS and hospital arrival times. RESULTS: A total of 448 patients were included. Hypothermia (<35°C) on hospital arrival was present in 64/448 patients (14%). Significant factors associated with the absence of hypothermia in a multivariate analysis were no intubation: Odds Ratio: 4.23 (95% confidence interval 1.62 to 1.02); RTS: 1.68 (1.29 to 2.20); mobile unit temperature: 1.20 (1.04 to 1.38); infusion fluid temperature: 1.17 (1.05 to 1.30); patient not unclothed: 0.40 (0.18 to 0.90); and no head injury: 0.36 (0.16 to 0.83). CONCLUSIONS: The key risk factor for the onset of hypothermia was the severity of injury but environmental conditions and the medical care provided by EMS were also significant factors. Changes in practice could help reduce the impact of factors such as infusion fluid temperature and mobile unit temperature.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 3%
Czechia 1 2%
Indonesia 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 58 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 18%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Other 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 17 26%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 62%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 12%
Engineering 5 8%
Psychology 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 6 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2018.
All research outputs
#2,407,129
of 13,727,890 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,859
of 4,330 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,141
of 122,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#14
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,727,890 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,330 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,091 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.