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Expression of 5α- and 5β-reductase in spinal cord and muscle of birds with different courtship repertoires

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, June 2016
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Title
Expression of 5α- and 5β-reductase in spinal cord and muscle of birds with different courtship repertoires
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12983-016-0156-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew J. Fuxjager, Eric R. Schuppe, John Hoang, Jennifer Chew, Mital Shah, Barney A. Schlinger

Abstract

Through the actions of one or more isoforms of the enzyme 5α-reductase in many male reproductive tissues, circulating testosterone (T) undergoes metabolic conversion into 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which binds to and activates androgen receptors (AR) with greater potency than T. In birds, T is also subject to local inactivation into 5β-DHT by the enzyme 5β-reductase. Male golden-collared manakins perform an androgen-dependent and physically elaborate courtship display, and these birds express androgen receptors in skeletal muscles and spinal cord at levels far greater than those expressed in species with more limited courtship routines, including male zebra finches. To determine if local T metabolism facilitates or impedes activation of male manakin courtship, we examined expression of two isoforms of 5α-reductase, as well as 5β-reductase, in forelimb muscles and spinal cords of males and females of the two aforementioned species. We found that all enzymes were expressed in all tissues, with patterns that partially predict a functional role for 5α-reductase in these birds, especially in both muscle and spinal cord of male manakins. Moreover, we found that 5β-reductase was markedly different between species, with far lower levels in golden-collared manakins, compared to zebra finches. Thus, modification to neuromuscular deactivation of T may also play a functional role in adaptive behavioral modulation. Given that such a role for 5α-reductase in androgen-sensitive mammalian skeletal muscle is in dispute, our data suggest that, in birds, local metabolism may play a key role in providing active androgenic substrates to peripheral neuromuscular systems. Similarly, we provide the first evidence that 5β-reductase is expressed broadly through an organism and may be an important factor that regulates androgenic modulation of neuromuscular functioning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 32%
Student > Bachelor 5 26%
Student > Master 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Professor 1 5%
Other 3 16%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 47%
Neuroscience 4 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2016.
All research outputs
#14,094,401
of 15,985,155 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#504
of 536 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,022
of 268,263 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#4
of 5 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 536 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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