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A qualitative study of how Danish drug consumption rooms influence health and well-being among people who use drugs

Overview of attention for article published in Harm Reduction Journal, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
A qualitative study of how Danish drug consumption rooms influence health and well-being among people who use drugs
Published in
Harm Reduction Journal, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12954-016-0109-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nanna Kappel, Eva Toth, Jette Tegner, Sigurd Lauridsen

Abstract

Drug use contributes to higher rates of morbidity and mortality among people who use drugs compared to the general population. In 2012, Danish politicians passed a law that allowed drug consumption rooms (DCRs) to operate; among the objectives were to improve the well-being of vulnerable citizens and to reduce the number of overdoses. Five Danish DCRs are currently being operated. This article presents results from a national investigation focused on assessing the impact of Danish drug consumption rooms on the health and well-being of DCR clients and factors facilitating the acceptance of DCR clients in order to improve their health and refer them onward to social and health service providers. We conducted 250 h of participant observation in the DCRs, followed by in-depth qualitative interviews with 42 DCR clients and 25 staff members. Field notes and interviews were analysed and coded, and themes have been developed. DCR clients experienced a sense of social acceptance while inside DCRs. Members of staff conveyed a welcoming, non-judgemental attitude, and DCR clients were predominantly satisfied with the facilities. They prioritized forging relations with drug users so as to foster a sense of social acceptance within DCRs. The primary goal of staff members is to prevent overdoses by informing clients about strong drugs and by intervening in cases of intoxication. DCRs provide security to clients. In cases of health-related problems, DCR clients were referred to local health clinics. Members of the staff build bridges for DCR clients by guiding them towards drug treatment programmes and services in the social and the health sectors. The study reveals a consistency between DCR clients and staff members with respect to appraisal of the importance of DCRs. Both clients and staff agreed that DCRs provide a safe haven in the environment in which DCR clients often live and that staff members' approach to clients with the intention of promoting acceptance clears the path for the prevention and treatment of overdoses and providing referrals to healthcare facilities, to drug treatment centres and to social services.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 107 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 23%
Student > Bachelor 23 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Lecturer 4 4%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 22 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 23 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Psychology 10 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 26 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2021.
All research outputs
#855,884
of 18,905,383 outputs
Outputs from Harm Reduction Journal
#137
of 747 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,273
of 228,685 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Harm Reduction Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,905,383 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 747 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,685 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them