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Reconstitution of immune cell in liver and lymph node of adult- and newborn-engrafted humanized mice

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Immunology, June 2016
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3 tweeters

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Title
Reconstitution of immune cell in liver and lymph node of adult- and newborn-engrafted humanized mice
Published in
BMC Immunology, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12865-016-0157-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Crystal Dykstra, Amanda J. Lee, Evan J. Lusty, Mira M. Shenouda, Mahsa Shafai, Fatemeh Vahedi, Marianne V. Chew, Stephen Collins, Ali A. Ashkar

Abstract

Humanized mouse models are an increasingly popular preclinical model to study the human immune response in a biological system. There are a variety of protocols to generate these mice, each differing in the strain of the recipient, source of hematopoietic stem cells, and mode of transplantation. Though there is well-documented reconstitution information regarding the spleen, blood, and bone marrow, there is little information regarding reconstitution of the lymph node and liver. In this report, we sought to compare reconstitution levels in a variety of immunological tissues, including the lymph node and liver, between mice engrafted intravenously as adults and intrahepatically in newborns. CD34+ cells were enriched from cord blood and transplanted intravenously into irradiated adult NOD-Rag1(-/-)IL2rγ(-/-) (NRG) mice or intra-hepatically into irradiated newborn NRG mice. At 9-28 weeks post-engraftment, immunological tissues were processed and analyzed for human lymphoid and myeloid subsets. Adult and newborn engrafted humanized mice were comparable in long-term reconstitution of human CD45 cells and subsequent lymphoid and myeloid subsets in the spleen, bone marrow, thymus, lymph node, and liver. Mice engrafted as newborns had a higher level of T-cells and a lower level of B-cells compared to mice engrafted as adults. We observed significant levels of human immune cell engraftment in both the lymph node and the liver, with a predominant adaptive immune population in both compartments. Human immune cells repopulate liver and mesenteric lymph nodes of NRG mice and can be used to study the human immune system in the gastrointestinal tract.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 24%
Researcher 5 20%
Student > Bachelor 4 16%
Other 3 12%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 5 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 6 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,896,706
of 13,104,802 outputs
Outputs from BMC Immunology
#217
of 439 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,518
of 264,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Immunology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,104,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 439 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them