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Maintenance-energy requirements and robustness of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at aerobic near-zero specific growth rates

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Cell Factories, June 2016
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Title
Maintenance-energy requirements and robustness of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at aerobic near-zero specific growth rates
Published in
Microbial Cell Factories, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12934-016-0501-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tim Vos, Xavier D. V. Hakkaart, Erik A. F. de Hulster, Antonius J. A. van Maris, Jack T. Pronk, Pascale Daran-Lapujade

Abstract

Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established microbial platform for production of native and non-native compounds. When product pathways compete with growth for precursors and energy, uncoupling of growth and product formation could increase product yields and decrease formation of biomass as a by-product. Studying non-growing, metabolically active yeast cultures is a first step towards developing S. cerevisiae as a robust, non-growing cell factory. Microbial physiology at near-zero growth rates can be studied in retentostats, which are continuous-cultivation systems with full biomass retention. Hitherto, retentostat studies on S. cerevisiae have focused on anaerobic conditions, which bear limited relevance for aerobic industrial processes. The present study uses aerobic, glucose-limited retentostats to explore the physiology of non-dividing, respiring S. cerevisiae cultures, with a focus on industrially relevant features. Retentostat feeding regimes for smooth transition from exponential growth in glucose-limited chemostat cultures to near-zero growth rates were obtained by model-aided experimental design. During 20 days of retentostats cultivation, the specific growth rate gradually decreased from 0.025 h(-1) to below 0.001 h(-1), while culture viability remained above 80 %. The maintenance requirement for ATP (mATP) was estimated at 0.63 ± 0.04 mmol ATP (g biomass)(-1) h(-1), which is ca. 35 % lower than previously estimated for anaerobic retentostats. Concomitant with decreasing growth rate in aerobic retentostats, transcriptional down-regulation of genes involved in biosynthesis and up-regulation of stress-responsive genes resembled transcriptional regulation patterns observed for anaerobic retentostats. The heat-shock tolerance in aerobic retentostats far exceeded previously reported levels in stationary-phase batch cultures. While in situ metabolic fluxes in retentostats were intentionally low due to extreme caloric restriction, off-line measurements revealed that cultures retained a high metabolic capacity. This study provides the most accurate estimation yet of the maintenance-energy coefficient in aerobic cultures of S. cerevisiae, which is a key parameter for modelling of industrial aerobic, glucose-limited fed-batch processes. The observed extreme heat-shock tolerance and high metabolic capacity at near-zero growth rates demonstrate the intrinsic potential of S. cerevisiae as a robust, non-dividing microbial cell factory for energy-intensive products.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Unknown 124 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 25%
Student > Master 31 25%
Researcher 14 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 4%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 28 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 40 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 25%
Chemical Engineering 8 6%
Engineering 6 5%
Environmental Science 3 2%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 28 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2016.
All research outputs
#7,778,803
of 12,902,716 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Cell Factories
#508
of 939 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,964
of 261,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Cell Factories
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,902,716 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 939 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,324 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them