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Current and future economic burden of diabetes among working-age adults in Asia: conservative estimates for Singapore from 2010-2050

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
135 Mendeley
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Title
Current and future economic burden of diabetes among working-age adults in Asia: conservative estimates for Singapore from 2010-2050
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2827-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

May Ee Png, Joanne Yoong, Thao Phuong Phan, Hwee Lin Wee

Abstract

Diabetes not only imposes a huge health burden but also a large economic burden worldwide. In the working-age population, cost of lost productivity can far exceed diabetes-related medical cost. In this study, we aimed to estimate the current and future indirect and excess direct costs of diagnosed type 2 diabetes among the working-age population in Singapore. A previously-published epidemiological model of diabetes was adapted to forecast prevalence among working-age patients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes in the absence of interventions. The current methodology of the American Diabetes Association was adopted to estimate the costs of diabetes for this population. Diabetes-related excess direct medical costs were obtained from a local cost study while indirect costs were calculated using the human capital approach applied to local labor force statistics. These cost were estimated conservatively from a societal perspective on a per patient basis and projected to the overall Singapore population from 2010 to 2050. In 2010, total economic costs per working-age patient were estimated to be US$5,646 (US$4,432-US$10,612), of which 42 % were excess direct medical costs and 58 % indirect productivity-related losses. Total cost is projected to rise to US$7,791 (US$5,741-US$12,756) in 2050, with the share of indirect costs rising to 65 %. Simultaneous increases in prevalence imply that the total economic costs of diabetes for the entire working-age population will increase by 2.4 fold from US$787 million in 2010 to US$1,867 million in 2050. By current projections, diabetes in Singapore represents a growing economic burden. Among the working-age population, the impact of productivity loss will become increasingly significant. Prevention efforts to reduce overall prevalence should also engage stakeholders outside the health sector who ultimately bear the indirect burden of disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Singapore 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 133 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 30 22%
Student > Master 20 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 10%
Researcher 11 8%
Other 9 7%
Other 21 16%
Unknown 30 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 27 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 16%
Social Sciences 9 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 4%
Other 30 22%
Unknown 34 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 36. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2019.
All research outputs
#515,082
of 14,155,626 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#484
of 9,749 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,160
of 263,200 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,155,626 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,749 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,200 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them