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Decreases in cerebral saturation in patients with septic shock are associated with increased risk of death: a prospective observational single center study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Intensive Care, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
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Title
Decreases in cerebral saturation in patients with septic shock are associated with increased risk of death: a prospective observational single center study
Published in
Journal of Intensive Care, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40560-016-0167-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Duane J. Funk, Anand Kumar, Gregory Klar

Abstract

The mortality rate from septic shock has been declining. Cerebral hypoxia, measured non-invasively with cerebral oximetry, has been correlated with neurologic and non-neurologic sequelae. Whether cerebral desaturations occur in septic shock patients and what consequences these may have is untested. Adult patients with septic shock had cerebral saturation monitoring initiated. The primary objective was to determine if the incidence and magnitude of cerebral desaturations in septic shock patients correlated with delirium. We also compared the incidence and magnitude of cerebral desaturations in patients with septic shock with patients undergoing high-risk non-cardiac surgical procedures, a group known to be at high risk for cerebral desaturations. Fifteen patients were enrolled. Twelve (80 %) patients had a decrease in SctO2 below 65 %. Delirium was not associated with the area under the curve of an SctO2 of 65 % (p = 0.84). Patients who died of septic shock had more significant decreases in SctO2 than those who survived (p = 0.04). Decreased SctO2 was more common in patients with septic shock and was of greater magnitude than those undergoing high-risk non-cardiac surgery. Cerebral desaturations occur more commonly and are of a greater magnitude in septic shock patients compared with those undergoing high-risk non-cardiac surgery. There did not appear to be a relationship between the incidence or magnitude of decreases in SctO2 and ICU delirium. Patients who died of septic shock had more significant decreases in SctO2 than patients who survived.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Other 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Engineering 3 10%
Neuroscience 2 7%
Materials Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,557,194
of 21,112,644 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Intensive Care
#243
of 477 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,248
of 275,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Intensive Care
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,112,644 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 477 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,569 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them