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A curious coincidence: mosquito biodiversity and the limits of the Japanese encephalitis virus in Australasia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2007
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters
pinterest
1 Pinner

Citations

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52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
A curious coincidence: mosquito biodiversity and the limits of the Japanese encephalitis virus in Australasia
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2007
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-7-100
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stéphane Hemmerter, Jan Šlapeta, Andrew F van den Hurk, Robert D Cooper, Peter I Whelan, Richard C Russell, Cheryl A Johansen, Nigel W Beebe

Abstract

The mosquito Culex annulirostris Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae) is the major vector of endemic arboviruses in Australia and is also responsible for the establishment of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in southern Papua New Guinea (PNG) as well as its incursions into northern Australia. Papua New Guinea and mainland Australia are separated by a small stretch of water, the Torres Strait, and its islands. While there has been regular JEV activity on these islands, JEV has not established on mainland Australia despite an abundance of Cx. annulirostris and porcine amplifying hosts. Despite the public health significance of this mosquito and the fact that its adults show overlapping morphology with close relative Cx. palpalis Taylor, its evolution and genetic structure remain undetermined. We address a hypothesis that there is significant genetic diversity in Cx. annulirostris and that the identification of this diversity will shed light on the paradox that JEV can cycle on an island 70 km from mainland Australia while not establishing in Australia itself.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Portugal 1 1%
Lithuania 1 1%
France 1 1%
China 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 82 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 16%
Other 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Student > Master 7 8%
Other 21 23%
Unknown 4 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 52%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 10%
Environmental Science 7 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 3%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 7 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2019.
All research outputs
#769,887
of 17,351,915 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#177
of 2,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,952
of 139,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,351,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,801 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 139,113 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them