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Insomnia and urban neighbourhood contexts – are associations modified by individual social characteristics and change of residence? Results from a population-based study using residential histories

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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Title
Insomnia and urban neighbourhood contexts – are associations modified by individual social characteristics and change of residence? Results from a population-based study using residential histories
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-810
Pubmed ID
Authors

Natalie Riedel, Kateryna Fuks, Barbara Hoffmann, Simone Weyers, Johannes Siegrist, Raimund Erbel, Anja Viehmann, Andreas Stang, Joachim Scheiner, Nico Dragano

Abstract

Until now, insomnia has not been much of interest in epidemiological neighbourhood studies, although literature provides evidence enough for insomnia-related mechanisms being potentially dependent on neighbourhood contexts. Besides, studies have shown differences in sleep along individual social characteristics that might render residents more vulnerable to neighbourhood contextual exposures. Given the role of exposure duration and changes in the relationship between neighbourhoods and health, we studied associations of neighbourhood unemployment and months under residential turnover with insomnia by covering ten years of residential history of nearly 3,000 urban residents in the Ruhr Area, Germany.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 59 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 31%
Social Sciences 11 18%
Psychology 8 13%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2012.
All research outputs
#3,344,353
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,729
of 8,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,576
of 127,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#24
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 127,912 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.