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Paclitaxel causes degeneration of both central and peripheral axon branches of dorsal root ganglia in mice

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, July 2016
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Title
Paclitaxel causes degeneration of both central and peripheral axon branches of dorsal root ganglia in mice
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12868-016-0285-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aniqa Tasnim, Zoe Rammelkamp, Amy B. Slusher, Krystyna Wozniak, Barbara S. Slusher, Mohamed H. Farah

Abstract

Peripheral neuropathy is a common and dose-limiting side effect of many cancer chemotherapies. The taxane agents, including paclitaxel (Taxol(®)), are effective chemotherapeutic drugs but cause degeneration of predominantly large myelinated afferent sensory fibers of the peripheral nervous system in humans and animal models. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons are sensory neurons that have unipolar axons each with two branches: peripheral and central. While taxane agents induce degeneration of peripheral axons, whether they also cause degeneration of central nervous system axons is not clear. Using a mouse model of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy, we investigated the effects of paclitaxel on the central branches of sensory axons. We observed that in the spinal cords of paclitaxel-intoxicated mice, degenerated axons were present in the dorsal columns, where the central branches of DRG axons ascend rostrally. In the peripheral nerves, degenerated myelinated fibers were present in significantly greater numbers in distal segments than in proximal segments indicating that this model exhibits the distal-to-proximal degeneration pattern generally observed in human peripheral nerve disorders. We conclude that paclitaxel causes degeneration of both the peripheral and central branches of DRG axons, a finding that has implications for the site and mode of action of chemotherapy agents on the nervous system.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 2%
Unknown 53 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 20%
Researcher 10 19%
Student > Master 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 3 6%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 12 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 12 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2016.
All research outputs
#18,465,704
of 22,880,230 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#884
of 1,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#270,858
of 354,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#20
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,880,230 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,247 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.