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Non-malaria fevers in a high malaria endemic area of Ghana

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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56 Mendeley
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Title
Non-malaria fevers in a high malaria endemic area of Ghana
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1654-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kwaku Poku Asante, Seth Owusu-Agyei, Matthew Cairns, Ellen Boamah, Grace Manu, Mieks Twumasi, Richard Gyasi, George Adjei, Kingsley Kayan, Emmanuel Mahama, David Kwame Dosoo, Kwadwo Koram, Brian Greenwood, Daniel Chandramohan

Abstract

The importance of fevers not due to malaria [non-malaria fevers, NMFs] in children in sub-Saharan Africa is increasingly being recognised. We have investigated the influence of exposure-related factors and placental malaria on the risk of non-malaria fevers among children in Kintampo, an area of Ghana with high malaria transmission. Between 2008 and 2011, a cohort of 1855 newborns was enrolled and followed for at least 12 months. Episodes of illness were detected by passive case detection. The primary analysis covered the period from birth up to 12 months of age, with an exploratory analysis of a sub-group of children followed for up to 24 months. The incidence of all episodes of NMF in the first year of life (first and subsequent) was 1.60 per child-year (95 % CI 1.54, 1.66). The incidence of NMF was higher among infants with low birth weight [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.22 (95 % CI 1.04-1.42) p = 0.012], infants from households of poor socio-economic status [aHR 1.22 (95 % CI 1.02-1.46) p = 0.027] and infants living furthest from a health facility [aHR 1.20 (95 % CI 1.01-1.43) p = 0.037]. The incidence of all episodes of NMF was similar among infants born to mothers with or without placental malaria [aHR 0.97 (0.87, 1.08; p = 0.584)]. The incidence of NMF in infancy is high in the study area. The incidence of NMF is associated with low birth weight and poor socioeconomic status but not with placental malaria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 29%
Researcher 11 20%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2016.
All research outputs
#1,827,266
of 8,514,100 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#734
of 3,788 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,704
of 262,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#38
of 186 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,514,100 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,788 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,246 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 186 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.