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4-Chloropropofol enhances chloride currents in human hyperekplexic and artificial mutated glycine receptors

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, September 2012
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2 tweeters

Citations

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Title
4-Chloropropofol enhances chloride currents in human hyperekplexic and artificial mutated glycine receptors
Published in
BMC Neurology, September 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2377-12-104
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeanne de la Roche, Martin Leuwer, Klaus Krampfl, Gertrud Haeseler, Reinhard Dengler, Vanessa Buchholz, Jörg Ahrens

Abstract

The mammalian neurological disorder hereditary hyperekplexia can be attributed to various mutations of strychnine sensitive glycine receptors. The clinical symptoms of "startle disease" predominantly occur in the newborn leading to convulsive hypertonia and an exaggerated startle response to unexpected mild stimuli. Amongst others, point mutations R271Q and R271L in the α1-subunit of strychnine sensitive glycine receptors show reduced glycine sensitivity and cause the clinical symptoms of hyperekplexia.Halogenation has been shown to be a crucial structural determinant for the potency of a phenolic compound to positively modulate glycine receptor function.The aim of this in vitro study was to characterize the effects of 4-chloropropofol (4-chloro-2,6-dimethylphenol) at four glycine receptor mutations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Bangladesh 1 8%
Unknown 11 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 33%
Researcher 4 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 25%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 17%
Neuroscience 2 17%
Chemistry 1 8%
Other 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2012.
All research outputs
#9,509,062
of 12,373,815 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#1,031
of 1,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,705
of 127,635 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,815 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,406 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 127,635 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them