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Total antioxidant intake and prostate cancer in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS) study. A case control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Total antioxidant intake and prostate cancer in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS) study. A case control study
Published in
BMC Cancer, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2486-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kjell M. Russnes, Elisabeth Möller, Kathryn M. Wilson, Monica Carlsen, Rune Blomhoff, Sigbjørn Smeland, Hans-Olov Adami, Henrik Grönberg, Lorelei A. Mucci, Katarina Bälter

Abstract

The total intake of dietary antioxidants may reduce prostate cancer risk but available data are sparse and the possible role of supplements unclear. We investigated the potential association between total and dietary antioxidant intake and prostate cancer in a Swedish population. We used FFQ data from 1499 cases and 1112 controls in the population based case-control study Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS). The ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) assay was used to assess the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of diet and supplements. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of prostate cancer across quintiles of antioxidant intake from all foods, from fruit and vegetables only, and from dietary supplements using unconditional logistic regression. Coffee comprised 62 % of the dietary antioxidant intake, tea 4 %, berries 4 %, chocolate 2 %, and boiled potatoes 2 %. In total 19 % and 13 % of the population took multivitamins and supplemental Vitamin C respectively, on a regular basis. Antioxidant intake from all foods and from fruits and vegetables separately measured by the FRAP assay was not associated with prostate cancer risk. For antioxidant intake from supplements we found a positive association with total, advanced, localized, high grade and low grade prostate cancer in those above median supplemental TAC intake of users compared to non-users (Adjusted ORs for total prostate cancer: 1.37, 95 % CI 1.08-1.73, advanced: 1.51, 95 % CI 1.11-2.06, localized: 1.36. 95 % CI 1.06-1.76, high grade 1.60, 95 % CI 1.06-2.40, low grade 1.36, 95 % CI 1.03-1.81). A high intake of coffee (≥6 cups/day) was associated with a possible risk reduction of fatal and significantly with reduced risk for high grade prostate cancer, adjusted OR: 0.45 (95 % CI: 0.22-0.90), whereas a high intake of chocolate was positively associated with risk of total, advanced, localized and low grade disease (adjusted OR for total: 1.43, 95 % CI 1.12-1.82, advanced: 1.40, 95 % CI 1.01-1.96, localized: 1.43, 95 % CI 1.08-1.88, low-grade: 1.41, 95 % CI 1.03-1.93). Total antioxidant intake from diet was not associated with prostate cancer risk. Supplement use may be associated with greater risk of disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Master 3 10%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 8 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2016.
All research outputs
#9,260,082
of 17,361,274 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,991
of 6,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,578
of 265,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,361,274 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,314 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,182 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them