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Psychometric properties of the Symptom Checklist-90 in adolescent psychiatric inpatients and age- and gender-matched community youth

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, July 2016
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2 tweeters

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47 Dimensions

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Title
Psychometric properties of the Symptom Checklist-90 in adolescent psychiatric inpatients and age- and gender-matched community youth
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13034-016-0111-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Minna Rytilä-Manninen, Sari Fröjd, Henna Haravuori, Nina Lindberg, Mauri Marttunen, Kirsi Kettunen, Sebastian Therman, Rytilä-Manninen, Minna, Fröjd, Sari, Haravuori, Henna, Lindberg, Nina, Marttunen, Mauri, Kettunen, Kirsi, Therman, Sebastian

Abstract

The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) is a questionnaire that is widely used to measure subjective psychopathology. In this study we investigated the psychometric properties of the SCL-90 among adolescent inpatients and community youth matched on age and gender. The final SCL-90 respondents comprised three subsets: 201 inpatients at admission, of whom 152 also completed the instrument at discharge, and 197 controls. The mean age at baseline was 15.0 years (SD 1.2), and 73 % were female. Differential SCL-90 item functioning between the three subsets was assessed with an iterative algorithm, and the presence of multidimensionality was assessed with a number of methods. Confirmatory factor analyses for ordinal items compared three latent factor models: one dimension, nine correlated dimensions, and a one-plus-nine bifactor model. Sensitivity to change was assessed with the bifactor model's general factor scores at admission and discharge. The accuracy of this factor in detecting the need for treatment used, as a gold standard, psychiatric diagnoses based on clinical records and the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) interview. Item measurement properties were largely invariant across subsets under the unidimensional model, with standardized factor scores at admission being 0.04 higher than at discharge and 0.06 higher than those of controls. Determination of the empirical number of factors was inconclusive, reflecting a strong main factor and some multidimensionality. The unidimensional factor model had very good fit, but the bifactor model offered an overall improvement, though subfactors accounted for little item variance. The SCL-90s ability to identify those with and without a psychiatric disorder was good (AUC = 83 %, Glass's Δ = 1.4, Cohen's d = 1.1, diagnostic odds ratio 12.5). Scores were also fairly sensitive to change between admission and discharge (AUC 72 %, Cohen's d = 0.8). The SCL-90 proved mostly unidimensional and showed sufficient item measurement invariance, and is thus a useful tool for screening overall psychopathology in adolescents. It is also applicable as an outcome measure for adolescent psychiatric patients. SCL-90 revealed significant gender differences in subjective psychopathology among both inpatients and community youth.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 90 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 19 21%
Unknown 23 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 19%
Neuroscience 6 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 30 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 July 2016.
All research outputs
#9,125,954
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#338
of 460 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,467
of 259,416 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 460 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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