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Fructose metabolism in humans – what isotopic tracer studies tell us

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 950)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Citations

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215 Dimensions

Readers on

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308 Mendeley
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Title
Fructose metabolism in humans – what isotopic tracer studies tell us
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1743-7075-9-89
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sam Z Sun, Mark W Empie

Abstract

Fructose consumption and its implications on public health are currently under study. This work reviewed the metabolic fate of dietary fructose based on isotope tracer studies in humans. The mean oxidation rate of dietary fructose was 45.0% ± 10.7 (mean ± SD) in non-exercising subjects within 3-6 hours and 45.8% ± 7.3 in exercising subjects within 2-3 hours. When fructose was ingested together with glucose, the mean oxidation rate of the mixed sugars increased to 66.0% ± 8.2 in exercising subjects. The mean conversion rate from fructose to glucose was 41% ± 10.5 (mean ± SD) in 3-6 hours after ingestion. The conversion amount from fructose to glycogen remains to be further clarified. A small percentage of ingested fructose (<1%) appears to be directly converted to plasma TG. However, hyperlipidemic effects of larger amounts of fructose consumption are observed in studies using infused labeled acetate to quantify longer term de novo lipogenesis. While the mechanisms for the hyperlipidemic effect remain controversial, energy source shifting and lipid sparing may play a role in the effect, in addition to de novo lipogenesis. Finally, approximately a quarter of ingested fructose can be converted into lactate within a few of hours. The reviewed data provides a profile of how dietary fructose is utilized in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 59 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 308 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 292 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 70 23%
Student > Master 56 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 12%
Researcher 23 7%
Student > Postgraduate 15 5%
Other 58 19%
Unknown 49 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 59 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 52 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 6%
Sports and Recreations 15 5%
Other 44 14%
Unknown 60 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 111. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2022.
All research outputs
#322,689
of 23,009,818 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#50
of 950 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,723
of 245,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#4
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,009,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 950 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,459 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.