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Longitudinal results of strengthening the parent-team alliance in child semi-residential psychiatry: does team investment make a difference?

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, July 2016
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1 tweeter

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Title
Longitudinal results of strengthening the parent-team alliance in child semi-residential psychiatry: does team investment make a difference?
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13034-016-0108-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Audri Lamers, Audri Lamers, Chijs Nieuwenhuizen, Jos Twisk, Erica Koning, Robert Vermeiren

Abstract

In a semi-residential setting where children switch daily between treatment and home, establishment of a strong parent-team alliance can be a challenge. The development of alliance with parents and the symptoms of the child might be strengthened by a structured investment of treatment team members. Participants were caregivers and treatment team members of 46 children (6-12 years) who received semi-residential psychiatric treatment. An A-B design was applied, in which the first 22 children were assigned to the comparison group receiving treatment as usual and the next 24 to the experimental group, where treatment team members used additional alliance-building strategies. Alliance and symptom questionnaires were filled out at three-month intervals during both treatment conditions. Parent-treatment team interactions, assessed on DVD, were coded according to members' adherence to these strategies. Multilevel analyses (using MLwiN) showed that based on reports of primary caregivers and a case manager, the alliance-building strategies had a statistically significant effect on the strength of the therapeutic alliance between treatment team members and parents. In addition, primary caregivers in the experimental group reported significant less hyperactivity symptoms of their children. Despite the methodological challenge of examining therapeutic processes in this complex treatment setting, this study supports the benefits of structured investment in the parent-team alliance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Other 3 8%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 11 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Decision Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 13 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2016.
All research outputs
#9,125,959
of 14,533,317 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#338
of 460 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,274
of 263,282 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,533,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 460 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,282 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.