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Hemothorax caused by spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgical Oncology, October 2012
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Title
Hemothorax caused by spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature
Published in
World Journal of Surgical Oncology, October 2012
DOI 10.1186/1477-7819-10-215
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fuminori Ono, Masaki Hiraga, Noriyuki Omura, Manabu Sato, Akihiro Yamamura, Megumi Obara, Jun Sato, Shoichi Onochi

Abstract

We report a rare case in which hemothorax occurred in addition to hemoperitoneum due to spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) originating from the caudate lobe of the liver. The case pertains to a 56-year-old female who was transported to our hospital for impaired consciousness due to hemorrhagic shock. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated ruptured HCC originating from the caudate lobe and accompanying hemoperitoneum and right hemothorax. Hemostasis was carried out by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE), and surgery was conducted approximately one month after TAE. In the present case, no lesions as possible sources of bleeding were observed inside the pleural cavity, and, moreover, the diaphragm had no abnormalities in the intraoperative findings, suggesting that blood from the ruptured tumor may have traversed the intact diaphragm to enter the right pleural cavity soon after the HCC rupture. However, to the best of our knowledge, no similar cases of HCC have been reported to date, and this case is thus believed to be very rare. This unusual phenomenon may therefore be strongly associated with the location of the ruptured tumor and the formation of a hematoma inside the omental bursa. We discuss the mechanism causing hemothorax in the present case and also review the previously reported cases of ruptured HCC complicated by hemothorax.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 33%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 17%
Lecturer 1 17%
Professor 1 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 17%
Unknown 2 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2012.
All research outputs
#9,958,564
of 12,440,173 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#673
of 1,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,813
of 128,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#16
of 50 outputs
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