↓ Skip to main content

EctD-mediated biotransformation of the chemical chaperone ectoine into hydroxyectoine and its mechanosensitive channel-independent excretion

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Cell Factories, July 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
EctD-mediated biotransformation of the chemical chaperone ectoine into hydroxyectoine and its mechanosensitive channel-independent excretion
Published in
Microbial Cell Factories, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12934-016-0525-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Czech, Nadine Stöveken, Erhard Bremer

Abstract

Ectoine and its derivative 5-hydroxyectoine are cytoprotectants widely synthesized by microorganisms as a defense against the detrimental effects of high osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Both ectoines possess the ability to preserve the functionality of proteins, macromolecular complexes, and even entire cells, attributes that led to their description as chemical chaperones. As a consequence, there is growing interest in using ectoines for biotechnological purposes, in skin care, and in medical applications. 5-Hydroxyectoine is synthesized from ectoine through a region- and stereo-specific hydroxylation reaction mediated by the EctD enzyme, a member of the non-heme-containing iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. This chemical modification endows the newly formed 5-hydroxyectoine with either superior or different stress- protecting and stabilizing properties. Microorganisms producing 5-hydroxyectoine typically contain a mixture of both ectoines. We aimed to establish a recombinant microbial cell factory where 5-hydroxyectoine is (i) produced in highly purified form, and (ii) secreted into the growth medium. We used an Escherichia coli strain (FF4169) defective in the synthesis of the osmostress protectant trehalose as the chassis for our recombinant cell factory. We expressed in this strain a plasmid-encoded ectD gene from Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 under the control of the anhydrotetracycline-inducible tet promoter. We chose the ectoine hydroxylase from P. stutzeri A1501 for our cell factory after a careful comparison of the in vivo performance of seven different EctD proteins. In the final set-up of the cell factory, ectoine was provided to salt-stressed cultures of strain FF4169 (pMP41; ectD (+)). Ectoine was imported into the cells via the osmotically inducible ProP and ProU transport systems, intracellularly converted to 5-hydroxyectoine, which was then almost quantitatively secreted into the growth medium. Experiments with an E. coli mutant lacking all currently known mechanosensitive channels (MscL, MscS, MscK, MscM) revealed that the release of 5-hydroxyectoine under osmotic steady-state conditions occurred independently of these microbial safety valves. In shake-flask experiments, 2.13 g l(-1) ectoine (15 mM) was completely converted into 5-hydroxyectoine within 24 h. We describe here a recombinant E. coli cell factory for the production and secretion of the chemical chaperone 5-hydroxyectoine free from contaminating ectoine.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Student > Master 5 14%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 27%
Engineering 2 5%
Chemistry 2 5%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 10 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2019.
All research outputs
#9,409,036
of 15,370,963 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Cell Factories
#613
of 1,126 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,655
of 265,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Cell Factories
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,370,963 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,126 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,654 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them