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Online interventions for problem gamblers with and without co-occurring mental health symptoms: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
118 Mendeley
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Title
Online interventions for problem gamblers with and without co-occurring mental health symptoms: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3291-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

John A. Cunningham, David C. Hodgins, Kylie Bennett, Anthony Bennett, Marina Talevski, Corey S. Mackenzie, Christian S. Hendershot

Abstract

Comorbidity between problem gambling and depression or anxiety is common. Further, the treatment needs of people with co-occurring gambling and mental health symptoms may be different from those of problem gamblers who do not have a co-occurring mental health concern. The current randomized controlled trial (RCT) will evaluate whether there is a benefit to providing access to mental health Internet interventions (G + MH intervention) in addition to an Internet intervention for problem gambling (G-only intervention) in participants with gambling problems who do or do not have co-occurring mental health symptoms. Potential participants will be screened using an online survey to identify participants meeting criteria for problem gambling. As part of the baseline screening process, measures of current depression and anxiety will be assessed. Eligible participants agreeing (N = 280) to take part in the study will be randomized to one of two versions of an online intervention for gamblers - an intervention that just targets gambling issues (G-only) versus a website that contains interventions for depression and anxiety in addition to an intervention for gamblers (G + MH). It is predicted that problem gamblers who do not have co-occurring mental health symptoms will display no significant difference between intervention conditions at a six-month follow-up. However, for those with co-occurring mental health symptoms, it is predicted that participants receiving access to the G + MH website will display significantly reduced gambling outcomes at six-month follow-up as compared to those provided with G-only website. The trial will produce information on the best means of providing online help to gamblers with and without co-occurring mental health symptoms. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02800096 ; Registration date: June 14, 2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 117 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 14%
Student > Master 16 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Other 22 19%
Unknown 31 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 37 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 8%
Social Sciences 8 7%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 33 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2016.
All research outputs
#4,182,533
of 9,772,987 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,793
of 7,613 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,103
of 263,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#167
of 351 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,772,987 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,613 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,956 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 351 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.