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Sweet's syndrome – a comprehensive review of an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, July 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
7 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
593 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
346 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Sweet's syndrome – a comprehensive review of an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, July 2007
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-2-34
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip R Cohen

Abstract

Sweet's syndrome (the eponym for acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is characterized by a constellation of clinical symptoms, physical features, and pathologic findings which include fever, neutrophilia, tender erythematous skin lesions (papules, nodules, and plaques), and a diffuse infiltrate consisting predominantly of mature neutrophils that are typically located in the upper dermis. Several hundreds cases of Sweet's syndrome have been published. Sweet's syndrome presents in three clinical settings: classical (or idiopathic), malignancy-associated, and drug-induced. Classical Sweet's syndrome (CSS) usually presents in women between the age of 30 to 50 years, it is often preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection and may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy. Approximately one-third of patients with CSS experience recurrence of the dermatosis. The malignancy-associated Sweet's syndrome (MASS) can occur as a paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with an established cancer or individuals whose Sweet's syndrome-related hematologic dyscrasia or solid tumor was previously undiscovered; MASS is most commonly related to acute myelogenous leukemia. The dermatosis can precede, follow, or appear concurrent with the diagnosis of the patient's cancer. Hence, MASS can be the cutaneous harbinger of either an undiagnosed visceral malignancy in a previously cancer-free individual or an unsuspected cancer recurrence in an oncology patient. Drug-induced Sweet's syndrome (DISS) most commonly occurs in patients who have been treated with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, however, other medications may also be associated with DISS. The pathogenesis of Sweet's syndrome may be multifactorial and still remains to be definitively established. Clinical and laboratory evidence suggests that cytokines have an etiologic role. Systemic corticosteroids are the therapeutic gold standard for Sweet's syndrome. After initiation of treatment with systemic corticosteroids, there is a prompt response consisting of dramatic improvement of both the dermatosis-related symptoms and skin lesions. Topical application of high potency corticosteroids or intralesional corticosteroids may be efficacious for treating localized lesions. Other first-line oral systemic agents are potassium iodide and colchicine. Second-line oral systemic agents include indomethacin, clofazimine, cyclosporine, and dapsone. The symptoms and lesions of Sweet's syndrome may resolved spontaneously, without any therapeutic intervention; however, recurrence may follow either spontaneous remission or therapy-induced clinical resolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 346 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 338 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 59 17%
Researcher 47 14%
Student > Postgraduate 44 13%
Student > Bachelor 31 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 8%
Other 88 25%
Unknown 49 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 239 69%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 1%
Unspecified 5 1%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 1%
Other 19 5%
Unknown 59 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2022.
All research outputs
#1,432,810
of 22,712,476 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#144
of 2,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,670
of 67,037 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,712,476 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,602 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 67,037 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them