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Informed decision-making among students analyzing their personal genomes on a whole genome sequencing course: a longitudinal cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
72 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Informed decision-making among students analyzing their personal genomes on a whole genome sequencing course: a longitudinal cohort study
Published in
Genome Medicine, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/gm518
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saskia C Sanderson, Michael D Linderman, Andrew Kasarskis, Ali Bashir, George A Diaz, Milind C Mahajan, Hardik Shah, Melissa Wasserstein, Randi E Zinberg, Micol Zweig, Eric E Schadt

Abstract

Multiple laboratories now offer clinical whole genome sequencing (WGS). We anticipate WGS becoming routinely used in research and clinical practice. Many institutions are exploring how best to educate geneticists and other professionals about WGS. Providing students in WGS courses with the option to analyze their own genome sequence is one strategy that might enhance students' engagement and motivation to learn about personal genomics. However, if this option is presented to students, it is vital they make informed decisions, do not feel pressured into analyzing their own genomes by their course directors or peers, and feel free to analyze a third-party genome if they prefer. We therefore developed a 26-hour introductory genomics course in part to help students make informed decisions about whether to receive personal WGS data in a subsequent advanced genomics course. In the advanced course, they had the option to receive their own personal genome data, or an anonymous genome, at no financial cost to them. Our primary aims were to examine whether students made informed decisions regarding analyzing their personal genomes, and whether there was evidence that the introductory course enabled the students to make a more informed decision.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 72 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 48 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Other 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Other 16 30%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 13%
Computer Science 3 6%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 54. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2016.
All research outputs
#607,083
of 21,454,959 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#112
of 1,363 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,481
of 303,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#4
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,454,959 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,363 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,201 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.