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Evaluation of TV commercials using neurophysiological responses

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, April 2015
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Title
Evaluation of TV commercials using neurophysiological responses
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40101-015-0056-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taeyang Yang, Do-Young Lee, Youngshin Kwak, Jinsook Choi, Chajoong Kim, Sung-Phil Kim

Abstract

In recent years, neuroscientific knowledge has been applied to marketing as a novel and efficient means to comprehend the cognitive and behavioral aspects of consumers. A number of studies have attempted to evaluate media contents, especially TV commercials using various neuroimaging techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG). Yet neurophysiological examination of detailed cognitive and affective responses in viewers is still required to provide practical information to marketers. Here, this study develops a method to analyze temporal patterns of EEG data and extract affective and cognitive indices such as happiness, surprise, and attention for TV commercial evaluation. Twenty participants participated in the study. We developed the neurophysiological indices for TV commercial evaluation using classification model. Specifically, these model-based indices were customized using individual EEG features. We used a video game for developing the index of attention and four video clips for developing indices of happiness and surprise. Statistical processes including one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) and the cross validation scheme were used to select EEG features for each index. The EEG features were composed of the combinations of spectral power at selected channels from the cross validation for each individual. The Fisher's linear discriminant classifier (FLDA) was used to estimate each neurophysiological index during viewing four different TV commercials. Post hoc behavioral responses of preference, short-term memory, and recall were measured. Behavioral results showed significant differences for all preference, short-term memory rates, and recall rates between commercials, leading to a 'high-ranked' commercial group and a 'low-ranked' group (P < 0.05). Neural estimation of happiness results revealed a significant difference between the high-ranked and the low-ranked commercials in happiness index (P < 0.01). The order of rankings based on happiness and attention matched well with the order of behavioral response rankings. In the elapsed-time analysis of the highest-ranked commercial, we could point to visual and auditory semantic structures of the commercial that induced increases in the happiness index. Our results demonstrated that the neurophysiological indices developed in this study may provide a useful tool for evaluating TV commercials.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 113 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Researcher 10 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 8%
Other 26 22%
Unknown 19 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Business, Management and Accounting 13 11%
Psychology 13 11%
Neuroscience 11 9%
Engineering 10 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 8%
Other 36 31%
Unknown 24 21%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2015.
All research outputs
#22,759,802
of 25,374,917 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#378
of 451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#240,241
of 279,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#9
of 10 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 451 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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