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Ethnobotany of wild plants used for starting fermented beverages in Shui communities of southwest China

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, May 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Ethnobotany of wild plants used for starting fermented beverages in Shui communities of southwest China
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0028-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liya Hong, Jingxian Zhuo, Qiyi Lei, Jiangju Zhou, Selena Ahmed, Chaoying Wang, Yuxiao Long, Feifei Li, Chunlin Long

Abstract

Shui communities of southwest China have an extensive history of using wild plants as starters (Xiaoqu) to prepare fermented beverages that serve important roles in interpersonal relationships and cultural events. While the practice of using wild plants as starters for the preparation of fermented beverages was once prevalent throughout China, this tradition has seen a decline nationally since the 1930s. The traditional technique of preparing fermented beverages from wild plant starters remains well preserved in the Shui communities in southwest China and provides insight on local human-environment interactions and conservation of plant biodiversity for cultural purposes. The present study sought to examine the ethnobotany of wild plants used as starters for the preparation of fermented beverages including an inventory of plants used as a starter in liquor fermentation and associated knowledge and practices. Field surveys were carried out that consisted of semi-structured surveys and plant species inventories. One hundred forty-nine informants in twenty Shui villages were interviewed between July 2012 and October 2014 to document knowledge associated with wild plants used as a liquor fermentation starter. The inventories involved plant voucher specimens and taxonomic identification of plant collections. A total of 103 species in 57 botanical families of wild plants were inventoried and documented that are traditionally used as starters for preparing fermented beverages by Shui communities. The majority of the species (93.2%) have multiple uses in addition to being used as a starter with medicinal purposes being the most prevalent. Shui women are the major harvesters and users of wild plants used as starters for preparing fermented beverages and transfer knowledge orally from mother to daughter. Findings from this study can serve as a basis for future investigation on fermented beverages and foods and associated knowledge and cultural practices. However, with rapid development, utilization of wild plants and the cultural systems that support them are at risk of erosion. Cultural preservation practices are necessary in Shui communities for the continued use and transmission of this ethnobiological knowledge as well as associated biodiversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ecuador 1 2%
Pakistan 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Unknown 61 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 16%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 15 23%
Unknown 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 9%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Chemical Engineering 2 3%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 19 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2016.
All research outputs
#6,855,562
of 21,419,046 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#302
of 704 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,385
of 249,751 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,419,046 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 704 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,751 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them